Climate action

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Key in the process for low-carbon transition is a transformation in all sectors and regions and the incorporation of new technologies and practices. Research and Innovation (R&I) is key in the development and successful uptake of clean technologies and focuses on three key non-mature technologies, CCS, advanced biofuels, and batteries for electric vehicles, as well as on energy efficiency measures explained in the report.

The transition to low carbon practices requires incorporating new technologies and practices, with Research and Innovation (R&I) being key in developing. Optimal R&I strategies increase the feasibility of ambitious climate stabilization targets by lowering carbon prices and mitigating costs.

Economic growth has been a priority for the European Union (EU) since its creation. The Paris Agreement targets will not be reached by technological and policy measures alone, businesses need to contribute and commit to the decarbonisation journey. The Business Guide calls to policymakers and businesses to move decarbonisation strategies from words to reality.

DEEDS’ knowledge base constitutes of two components: the scenario explorer and the technology database and intends to reach out to a broader audience and academia who could deliver deep and rapid reductions in emissions. This may help stakeholders to access detailed information about expected European emission limits, technology markets and energy prices, to develop strategies and understand the market potential for technologies consistent with decarbonisation pathways.

The largest short-term reduction in energy use and largest short-term reduction in energy use and carbon emissions in a lifetime is a result from the Covid-19 pandemic and are still in the process of being assessed. This had led to significant changes in people’s day to days lives that are unparalleled in the last few decades.

Renewable energy cooperation can play an important role in the energy transition in the European Union through international trade, safeguarding security of energy supply, coordinated climate adaptation measures, and optimizing the cost-effectiveness of actions. Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) could play a useful role, e.g. contributing to achieve climate goals in certain countries, or supporting the energy system with dispatchable electricity, they also believe that this role could be filled by realizing other options.

The European climate change strategies key element is the transition of the energy system towards a more sustainable energy supply, and the decarbonisation of the electricity sector through the deployment of renewable energy technologies. Concentrated Solar Power (CSP), as a dispatchable renewable energy technology combined with thermal energy storage, could contribute to the deep decarbonisation of the European Energy system by providing sustainable electricity and adding to system flexibility.

Individual behaviour could also play a crucial role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This research explored the impact a range of behaviour changes across mobility, food, heating, leisure, and waste would have on Greenhouse Gas emissions. The results show that individuals’ moderate to rigorous behaviour change in the EU could reduce per capita carbon footprint by 6-16%. Three behavioural profiles were used to estimate emission impact from changes in behaviour: Enthusiast, Conscious and Convenient profiles. The benefits from behaviour change would be significant emission reductions and a variety of co-benefits for public health, land use, and regional ecology.

The business case for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power) is difficult to establish for importer countries as well as exporter countries and its impacts. Although the impacts of the energy transition have recently emerged in the geopolitics, CSP, is almost absent from both the academic and the policy-oriented geopolitical literature. This post further discusses the context of policies for CSP deployment by renewable energy cooperation in the EU.