Supplying clean, affordable, and secure energy

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Studies indicate the actual cost of global warming will be highest for the three top emitting countries: China, India and US and with the most to lose from climate change. The cost is higher than first assumed. Many countries have not yet recognised the risk posed by climate change. This study aims at filling this gap and shows mapping of domestic impacts of climate change can help better understand the determinants of international cooperation.

The European Union aims for 2030 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40% compared to 1990 levels. Furthermore, the long-term vision is to become climate-neutral by 2050; this means transforming the current energy system. Compiled from MUSTEC’s research activities, key drivers and policy decisions are identified and explained for effective CSP deployment in Europe in the coming years up to 2050.

The largest short-term reduction in energy use and largest short-term reduction in energy use and carbon emissions in a lifetime is a result from the Covid-19 pandemic and are still in the process of being assessed. This had led to significant changes in people’s day to days lives that are unparalleled in the last few decades.

Renewable energy cooperation can play an important role in the energy transition in the European Union through international trade, safeguarding security of energy supply, coordinated climate adaptation measures, and optimizing the cost-effectiveness of actions. Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) could play a useful role, e.g. contributing to achieve climate goals in certain countries, or supporting the energy system with dispatchable electricity, they also believe that this role could be filled by realizing other options.

The European climate change strategies key element is the transition of the energy system towards a more sustainable energy supply, and the decarbonisation of the electricity sector through the deployment of renewable energy technologies. Concentrated Solar Power (CSP), as a dispatchable renewable energy technology combined with thermal energy storage, could contribute to the deep decarbonisation of the European Energy system by providing sustainable electricity and adding to system flexibility.

Biomass and its demand are growing for multiple uses, such as food for humans and livestock, biofuels, and biomaterials. So, the competition for the biomass itself, as well as that for the natural and socio-economic resources required for its production, is expected to worsen. The assessment of biofuels as an innovation has shown to be a complex issue and difficult to address with conventional modelling approaches for the following reasons explained in this post.