Energy saving, energy efficiency and behavioural change

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Studies indicate the actual cost of global warming will be highest for the three top emitting countries: China, India and US and with the most to lose from climate change. The cost is higher than first assumed. Many countries have not yet recognised the risk posed by climate change. This study aims at filling this gap and shows mapping of domestic impacts of climate change can help better understand the determinants of international cooperation.

A recent paper in the journal Energy Research & Social Science by MAGIC researchers Ansel Renner and Mario Giampietro (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) presents a novel approach to the responsible use of […]

Covid-19 has particularly impacted mobility due to a fall in transport activities. If this fall is to continue is uncertain and what the implications on policy are. However, post-COVID recovery offers a critical policy window for managing adverse effects on energy demand. Strengthening and countering policies for impacts from COVID-19 are discussed and what impact this has on mobility and homes.

Pandemics have led to an increase in inequality. After COVID-19, an additional 75 million of poor is estimated at the global level in 2020. Current policies to address inequality are inadequate; policymakers should aim to mitigate climate change and recovery from the COVID-19 crisis while protecting the most vulnerable.

COVID-19 economic recovery could slow down global warming by up to half if we make the right choices, and by taking action that tackles both crises, we can ensure that a more resilient world emerges on the other side. Doing so means cutting emissions hard and fast, investing in green technologies and industries, and refusing to bail out fossil fuel companies. High-level action would get us on track for net-zero CO2 emissions by mid-century and give us a good chance of keeping temperature rise below 1.5°C.

COVID-19 pandemic has led to the worst economic downturn of the last decades mainly due to measures to stop the spread of the virus. This has led to reduction in demand and production capacity. Governments worldwide adopt packages as a response to the COVID-19 crisis, with $3.5 trillion dedicated to climate protections in the agriculture, industry, energy, and transport sectors. By adapting packages that are green, boosts economic growth worldwide triggered by increased low-carbon investment.

Key in the process for low-carbon transition is a transformation in all sectors and regions and the incorporation of new technologies and practices. Research and Innovation (R&I) is key in the development and successful uptake of clean technologies and focuses on three key non-mature technologies, CCS, advanced biofuels, and batteries for electric vehicles, as well as on energy efficiency measures explained in the report.

The transition to low carbon practices requires incorporating new technologies and practices, with Research and Innovation (R&I) being key in developing. Optimal R&I strategies increase the feasibility of ambitious climate stabilization targets by lowering carbon prices and mitigating costs.