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Studies indicate the actual cost of global warming will be highest for the three top emitting countries: China, India and US and with the most to lose from climate change. The cost is higher than first assumed. Many countries have not yet recognised the risk posed by climate change. This study aims at filling this gap and shows mapping of domestic impacts of climate change can help better understand the determinants of international cooperation.

DEEDS’ knowledge base constitutes of two components: the scenario explorer and the technology database and intends to reach out to a broader audience and academia who could deliver deep and rapid reductions in emissions. This may help stakeholders to access detailed information about expected European emission limits, technology markets and energy prices, to develop strategies and understand the market potential for technologies consistent with decarbonisation pathways.

Individual behaviour could also play a crucial role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This research explored the impact a range of behaviour changes across mobility, food, heating, leisure, and waste would have on Greenhouse Gas emissions. The results show that individuals’ moderate to rigorous behaviour change in the EU could reduce per capita carbon footprint by 6-16%. Three behavioural profiles were used to estimate emission impact from changes in behaviour: Enthusiast, Conscious and Convenient profiles. The benefits from behaviour change would be significant emission reductions and a variety of co-benefits for public health, land use, and regional ecology.

GHG emissions need to be reduced practically to zero by 2050. However, there are currently numerous coal-fired power stations around the world at different stages of construction, and if built and become active, their expected future emissions will make it difficult to reach the targets in the Paris Agreement. Carbon Capture and Storage could reduce future emissions, but its future availability is still highly uncertain.